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Contemporary Hispanic Cinema

Interrogating the Transnational in Spanish and Latin American Film

Núria Triana-Toribio
Barcode 9781855662612
Book

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Original price $118.99 - Original price $118.99
Original price
$118.99
$118.99 - $118.99
Current price $118.99

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Release Date: 16/08/2013

Genre: Music Dance & Theatre
Label: Tamesis Books
Contributors: Núria Triana-Toribio (Contributions by), Deborah Shaw (Contributions by), Stephanie Dennison (Edited by), Catherine Leen (Contributions by), Stephanie Dennison (Contributions by), Marvin D'Lugo (Contributions by), Sarah Barrow (Contributions by), Libia Villazana (Contributions by), Tamara Falicov (Contributions by), Alessandra Meleiro (Contributions by)
Language: English
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer Ltd

Interrogating the Transnational in Spanish and Latin American Film. This collection of original essays focuses on the cross-currents and points of contact among Spain, Portugal and Latin America and their impact on the regions' film industries. This collection of original essays focuses on the cross-currents and points of contact among Spain, Portugal and Latin America and their impact on the regions' film industries.This book focuses on the cross-currents and points of contact in film production among so-called Hispanic countries (Spain, Portugal and Latin America), and in particular the impact that co-production and supranational funding initiatives are having on both the film industries and the films of Latin America in the twenty-first century. Together with chapters that discuss and further develop transnational approaches to reading films in the Hispanic and Latin American context, the volume includes chapters that focus on funding initiatives, such as IBERMEDIA, that are aimed at Spain, Portugal and Latin America. An analysis of such initiatives facilitates a nuanced discussion of the range of meanings afforded to the term transnationalism: from the workings of those driven by economic imperatives, such as co-productions and 'Hispanic' film festivals, to the cultural, for example the invention of a marketable 'Latinamericaness' in Spain, or a 'Hispanic aesthetic' elsewhere. Stephanie Dennison is Reader in Brazilian Studies at the University of Leeds